Over EZ with Rick





Walter Cronkite

There's something I'm starting to realize as I grow older. You don't lose your childhood when you turn sweet 16, or 21. It doesn't happen when you start to shave, or your voice changes. No, your childhood disappears when all of your boyhood idols are gone. For me, Walter Cronkite was one of those. Oh sure, I miss John Wayne and Bob Hope and countless others I wanted to be like. But I was never going to be an actor, or an astronaut, or a war hero. An announcer was always the path for me and with the passing of Paul Harvey first, and now Walter Cronkite, the two men whose careers I most wanted to mirror have gone, and my childhood heroes with them.
Walter Cronkite was the man who told me what was right, and was wrong with the world. He showed you could have emotion as a newsman, as long as it was controlled, and he gave you all the news, not just a :30 second cover version. You felt smarter for having spent a half-hour with him. And as I watched the clips last night of his Apollo newscast and others, I found myself comforted by hearing his voice, like I had been so many times before. I don't expect there'll be a big concert in his honor, and Walter Cronkite newscasts probably won't make the Top 10 downloads on I-Tunes. But I do hope people will reflect on the passing of the man who was the historian of generations and know we've moved a little further down the road from our childhood. Rest in peace Walter Cronkite.




 
07/18/2009 9:17AM
Walter Cronkite
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07/18/2009 12:03PM
John DeFelice
Walter Cronkite was everyone's favorite "TV Uncle" when I was a kid coming to age in the 60's. He was the most truthful person that there ever was on tv. Everyone felt the same about the man. His interview with President Kennedy inspired all of us (especially when asked by Cronkite) when JFK let us know his 1964 re-election platform included no war with North Viet Nam (how different the USA would be if JFK lived). The sad thing today is hardly any of the younger generation know who Cronkite was. But I will also remember him saying in his TV series,.." and folks remember,..You Are There !"
07/19/2009 7:02PM
Jane Crisman
My parents were more NBC people than CBS people, so Walter didn't have as much of an impact on me, I suppose. There is one point in time, however, when I remember he being a huge presence in my life and that was when President Kennedy was assassinated, and during the days that followed. And I remember the Democratic Convention coverage in 1969 in Chicago. Who could forget that? In looking back at the archives that were played whenever he was featured or interviewed after he retired, with the exception of his declaration of the inability of the Viet Nam war to be "won," I was always amazed at his objectivity and even-handedness in reporting the news. He reported it; he didn't make it, and he didn't opine. Sure, after he'd retired, I found myself in disagreement with him on many issues, bu always admired him for speaking his mind and being true to his feelngs and what he believed was right. I always agreed with him about the state of journalism and it amazed me that his own industry, who claimed to revere him (and still does) did not seem to listen to his wise words. It is a pity that true American professionals like Walter Cronkite and David Brinkley weren't only admired - they should have been emulate more, too. Yes, we've lost another member of the Greatest Generation, and we are all reduced by his passing.
07/20/2009 5:40AM
Nancy Connelly
Walter Cronkite was the only evening newsman we ever watch once we got our first TV I have always had so much respect for him. My most memorable memory was his announcement that our President Kennedy had passed away, his emotion captured my heart, he wasso human in every respect of his life, he will always be missed by Mom and I. The respect we have for you is so equal to that of Walter Cronkite, you help make all of us better human beings, thanks for being you!!!!!
07/20/2009 6:40AM
Bill WIlson
7-20-09 Rick, You may not remember back as far as me but as a history buff, I also remember Walter Conkite hosting "You Were There" where he would inteview great characters in history such as George Washington at Vallye Forge and Napolean at Waterloo. At the end, Cronkite would say (roughly from my memory) "and that is the way it was, a point in history that altered and illuminated our time and you were there." Certainly the moon landing and Kennedy's death are in all of the memories of those of use around in the 60's and 70's. I am not suprised that you had heroes in Cronkite and Paul Harvey. The other who shuld probably be in that category and who for years was on the radio was Lowell Thomas. I recall he was from Cripple Creek. Good stuff! Bill Wilson
07/20/2009 6:43AM
Bill WIlson
7-20-09 Rick, You may not remember back as far as me but as a history buff, I also remember Walter Conkite hosting “You Were There” where he would interview great characters in history such as George Washington at Vallye Forge and Napolean at Waterloo. At the end, Cronkite would say (roughly from my memory) “and that is the way it was, a point in history that altered and illuminated our time and you were there.” Certainly the moon landing and Kennedy’s death are in all of the memories of those of use around in the 60’s and 70’s. I am not suprised that you had heroes in Cronkite and Paul Harvey. The other who should probably be in that category and who for years was on the radio was Lowell Thomas. I recall he was from Cripple Creek. Good stuff! Bill Wilson
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